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The Clun Forest originated in the mountainous district of South West Shropshire in England, adjoining the Welsh Border, and are the most numerous sheep of the Marshes of Wales. They take their name from the ancient market town of Clun.  Some authors attribute the breed to a combination of Hill…
The Cormo was developed in the earlier part of the 1960′s in Tasmania, Australia. To arrive at the current day Cormo rams of the Corriedale breed were crossed with Superfine Saxon Merinos. The name Cormo is from the names of two of the parent breeds, Corriedale and Merino.  They are…
The Corriedale is the oldest of all the crossbred wool breeds, a Merino-Lincoln cross developed in Australia and New Zealand and first brought to the United States in 1914.  It is large-framed, polled with good carcass quality.  Although its role has traditionally been to produce premium lambs when mated to…
Cotswolds are a large breed, noted for their long, coarse fleece of naturally wavy curls and the tuft of wool on their foreheads. The earliest record of Cotswolds in the United States is 1832. The Cotswold is classified as a “rare” breed by the American Livestock Breeds Conservancy. Breed Category:…
The Dorper, developed in South Africa, is primarily a mutton sheep and meets these requirements exceptionally well.  The breed shows exceptional adaptability, hardiness, reproduction rates and growth as well as good mothering abilities. They are a hair sheep. The Dorper breed is numerically the second largest breed in South Africa.…
Dorsets are an all white sheep of medium size having good body length and muscle conformation to produce a desirable carcass. The fleece is very white, strong, close and free from dark fiber. Dorset fleeces average five to nine pounds (2.25-4 kg) in the ewes with a yield of between…
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